Freecycle: The Wonders and Pitfalls

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Why have I not discovered Freecycle sooner? It’s free stuff, as in ‘pay nothing’ and someone gives you something. It’s great. Until you realise you’ve been ‘gifted’ a fridge that’s missing two shelves and needs a whole new door – cost £106 – or to be taken to the tip – cost £22 if the council take it away. We ended up paying £22 to get rid of something that was supposedly ‘free’. Fortunately we saw a ‘reconditioned’ fridge in our local furniture store so we were able to buy a fridge and support a local business, which is something. Admittedly I did also get the council to remove a couple of old mattresses (too stained to be reused) at the same time as the fridge so I would have paid that money anyway, but still… it’s the intentions of the giver that are questionable. I shan’t be so trusting in future and will insist on looking at the thing first.

However, we also managed to get hold of a freezer via Freecycle and that has been great. Nice people gave it to us, no problems. Works fine. The moral of the story: some people use Freecycle as a means of getting rid of junk because they can’t be bothered to take it to the tip (or don’t have the means to so decide to trick someone else into doing it for them!). Whether they couldn’t or wouldn’t I’m less than impressed o_O In future I will take all Freecycle offers with a pinch of salt.

Verdict: Freecycle is a wonderful idea and when it works it’s an example of the very best of humanity and the very best of eco-friendly principles in action. But there are a lot of chancers out there, so although I will remain a committed user of Freecycle, I will be more careful to inspect something before I take it into my home.